Growing an In-Sync Child – Fun Activities for Kids to Develop, Learn and Grow

Growing an In-Sync Child – Fun Activities for Kids to Develop, Learn and Grow

Parents, educators, therapists, and countless kids have been touched by Carol Kranowitzs successful child developmental books.  In 2010, Carol Kranowitz teamed up with Joye Newman and they wrote Growing an In-Sync Child: Simple, Fun Activities to Help Every Child Develop, Learn, and Grow.  Based on the authors’ more than seventy combined years of professional success working with children of all abilities, they have penned another wonderful resource for caregivers of young children.

In Growing an In-Sync Child readers will find sixty simple, fun activities for kids that make up the In-Sync Program. The program is designed to give your child the movement experience he needs to get In-Sync.  The authors tell us that childhood motor development is the foundation for a child’s physical, emotional, and academic success. They show how even skipping, rolling, balancing and jumping can make a world of difference for our children.

High Fives to Carol and Joye for their advice to parents and their philosophy on child development.  They say about today’s society: “Today, the emphasis on early academic achievements and technological expertise, as well as the modern conveniences all around us, have resulted in a world in which sedentary activities have become the norm.” They add:” Times may change, but the time required for a child to grow and develop never will. Human development permits no shortcuts.” YES, I totally agree!

Sage parenting advice found tucked here and there in this book…

  • The In-Sync child is a successful child.
  • Instant gratification may be possible when booting up a computer, but it is impossible when raising a child.
  • Children are expected to do more than their bodies are ready to do.
  • All children require movement experiences to build a sturdy foundation.
  • Most kids develop in the same sequence, but not at the same rate.
  • Practice of a basic skill makes subsequent skills easier to acquire.
  • Do not be overprotective and overhelpful—children need  independence to reach their potential.
  • Repetition is a wonderful tool for learning.
  • Success is a powerful motivator.

How Is an In-Sync Child?

The authors describe an In-Sync child like this:  ” … movements are efficient and fluid. You feel comfortable in your body, and when you are comfortable in your body, you feel good. When you feel good, you function better. Everything works.

In-Sync Activity Cards: 50 Simple, New Activities to Help Children Develop, Learn, and Grow!In 2012, Carol Kranowitz and Joye Newman have come out with In-Sync Activity Cards: 50 Simple, New Activities to Help Children Develop, Learn, and Grow! Based on their book, Growing an In-Sync Child – Fun Activities for Kids to Develop, Learn and Grow, these cards are also for ALL children of all abilities. And the same high quality standard you are accustomed to find in other Newman and Kranowitz products is found in this small box of activity cards. See our review of the In-Sync Activity Cards here.

How Is an Out-of-Sync Child?

The Out-of-Sync child is described like this: “…may be clumsy, trip over themselves, avoid playground equipment, exhibit behavior problems, and have noticeably low self-esteem. They often develop into adults who are equally uncomfortable in their own bodies.”

How is MY Child?Toddler in puddle -  Activities to Help Children Develop, Learn, and Grow!

After answering a twelve question abilities and behaviour quiz on your child, you can see in which areas your child needs reinforcements.  Next you incorporate the In-Sync Program activities as part of your daily life.  The authors firmly believe that Sensory and motor experiences are crucial for children’s development and learning.

By using the In-Sync Program, parents will understand their child’s sensory, perceptual motor, and visual processing development. They will be able to see if their child needs professional intervention.

In Part Four, parents can read Watching Your Child Grow: Developmental Milestones. These general guidelines on the sequential developmental of basic motor skills are for children between the ages of 2 and 6. The authors remind us often that children develop at different rates and at different times. These milestones may raise concerns, which is a good thing, because then parents can consult a pediatrician for early intervention.

Activities in the In-Sync Program

  • Developmentally based skills—Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced
  • Flexible and Adaptable—Customize activities to suit child’s specific needs
  • Addressing many skills at the same time—Activities incorporate sensory, motor, and visual skills

Features of the In-Sync Program

  • Easy to use—Simple instructions, minimal equipment
  • Portable—Do activities indoors, outdoors, playground, backyard, bringing in groceries…
  • Expandable—Adapt, add, invent other activities
  • Inclusive—Include friends and family to ‘play with you’
  • Economical—Cost of the book, simple equipment, and your TIME

Please Note: We are updating this post October 2016:

The Out-of-Sync Child Grows Up: Coping with Sensory Processing Disorder in the Adolescent and Young Adult Years by Carol Stock Kranowitz, MA. with a foreword by Lucy Jane Miller, PhD, OTR., author of Sensational Kids. is the long-awaited follow-up to the million-copy bestseller The Out-of-Sync Child. It presents information and advice for tweens, teens, and young adults living with Sensory Processing Disorder, and their parents and it only came out in the Spring of 2016. Read our review of The Out-of-Sync Child Grows Up.

Carol Kranowitz and Joye Newman authors of Growing an In-Sync Child: Simple, Fun Activities to Help Every Child Develop, Learn, and Grow. Meet Carol Kranowitz, MA

Carol (to the right of photo) was a teacher at St. Columba’s Nursery School in Washington, DC for 25 years. In the 1980s, Carol and an occupational therapist began screening preschoolers for Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD), a common developmental problem causing difficulty in interpreting and using sensory. They guided children with probable SPD into occupational therapy, the primary treatment for this disorder.

They steered other children with perceptual motor problems (and possible SPD) into purposeful physical activities, best found at organizations such as Joye Newman’s Kids Moving Company. Joye and Carol met and have been buddies ever since.

In 1995, Carol earned her master’s degree in Education and Human Development at The George Washington University. She created a course of study about her special interest in sensory processing and turned her thesis into her book, “The Out-of-Sync Child: Recognizing and Coping with Sensory Processing Disorder”

Her website is www.out-of-sync-child.com

Read our Interview with Carol Stock Kranowitz.

Meet Joye Newman, MA

Joye (to the left of photo) is a perceptual motor therapist. Perceptual Motor Therapy (PMT) helps children, and also adults, to develop and enhance basic movement and learning abilities. Integrating studies in behavioral optometry, occupational therapy, and psychology into her graduate work, she developed her unique method of PMT.

Sept 1st, 2016 Farewell from Joye:
It is with a bittersweet mixture of regret, gratitude, and excitement that I have decided, after more than 35 years to close Kids Moving Company effective September 1, 2016. I have been the recipient of a lifetime’s worth of knowledge gleaned from my colleagues, the children I’ve had the opportunity to meet, school directors with which we’ve worked, and the incredibly gifted and innovative teachers who have proudly worn their KMC t-shirts throughout the years. It has been an amazing ride and I am so proud of what we’ve accomplished, helping children to feel good about themselves because they feel comfortable in their bodies.

I will continue my private practice under my own name, (joyenewman@me.com) and I will continue to post articles about the importance of movement, the importance of play, and all things movement related (including the potential dangers of too many screens) on the Facebook page, “Growing an In-Sync Child.” Please visit……

It has been my honor to serve as director of Kids Moving Company and I thank each and every one of you for your The Out-of-Sync Child Grows Up: Coping with Sensory Processing Disorder in the Adolescent and Young Adult Years – May 24 2016 -by CAROL STOCK KRANOWITZ, MA,support.

Be well and keep on moving!!

Read our Interview with Joye Newman

Buy Books by Carol Stock Kranowitz or co-authored by her: 

  • The Out-of-Sync Child Grows Up: Coping with Sensory Processing Disorder in the Adolescent and Young Adult Years – May 24th, 2016  Amazon.com  Amazon.ca
  • In-Sync Activity Cards: 50 Simple, New Activities to Help Children Develop, Learn, and Grow! – May 16th, 2012 Amazon.com Amazon.ca 
  • Growing an In-Sync Child – Fun Activities for Kids to Develop, Learn and Grow – May 4th, 2010  Amazon.com Amazon.ca 
  • The Goodenoughs Get in Sync: 5 Family Members Overcome Their Special Sensory Issues – April 1st, 2010  Amazon.com Amazon.ca 
  • The Out-of-Sync Child: Recognizing and Coping with Sensory Processing Disorder Revised Edition by Carol Kranowitz (Author), Lucy Jane Miller (Preface)Out-of-Sync Child: Recognizing and Coping with Sensory Processing Disorder  – April 4th, 2006 Amazon.com  Amazon.ca 

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This post was written by Lorna
Lorna d’Entremont: Co-owner of SentioLife Solutions, Ltd. the company behind KidCompanions Chewelry (2007) and SentioCHEWS (2013), mother of three, grandma of 5 and wife. She is a retired teacher and special needs advocate. Throughout she has taught all levels from grade 2 to grade 9. Lorna loved teaching and enjoyed seeing the students progress in the school system. During her 30 year career she took a few years off to raise her three children.
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