The Out-of-Sync Child: Recognizing and Coping with Sensory Processing Disorder by Carol Kranowitz

The Out-of-Sync Child: Recognizing and Coping with Sensory Processing Disorder by Carol Kranowitz

Carol Stock Kranowitz, MA is best-known for her book, The Out-of-Sync Child: Recognizing and Coping with Sensory Processing Disorder. It has sold 1,000,000 copies since publication in 1998 and has been translated into 11 languages. What is sensory processing disorder? Sensory processing disorder is a common, but misunderstood, problem which affects children’s behavior, influencing the way they learn, move, relate to others, and feel about themselves.

As a music, movement, and drama teacher for 25 years (1976-2001), Carol Stock Kranowitz observed many out-of-sync preschoolers. To help them become more competent in their work and play, she began to study sensory processing and sensory integration (“SI”) theory.

Carol has written NINE books and manuals, chapters for other authors in half a dozen books and as many forewords. Most of her books have been translated in many languages. See Carol’s web site for more information about her books and presentations.The Out-of-Sync Child Grows Up: Coping with Sensory Processing Disorder in the Adolescent and Young Adult Years – May 24 2016 -by CAROL STOCK KRANOWITZ, MA,

Her “Sync” series started with The Out-of-Sync Child  in 1998 with the revised and updated edition coming out in April of 2006. The preface is written by another expert and author, Lucy Jane Miller

Special Needs Book Review has just posted the review of “The Out-of-Sync Child Grows Up: Coping with Sensory Processing Disorder in the Adolescent and Young Adult Years“ by Carol Stock Kranowitz. We also were so pleased that Ms. Kranowitz, this award winning author and expert on sensory processing disorder took part in our Author Interview Series.

Since the launch of our book review site we have reviewed other books and resources by Carol Stock Kranowitz and you can find the links at the end of this post; however, we had never reviewed her revised and updated, very popular book, The Out-of-Sync Child: Recognizing and Coping with Sensory Processing Disorder and want to tell you about it in this post.

From Carol Kranowitz’s web site I learned the following:

The Out-of-Sync Child has been:

  • Translated into many foreign languages
  • Awarded Exceptional Parent magazine’s Symbol of Excellence
  • Selected as one of Brain, Child magazine’s top 10 books about parenting children with disabilities
  • Selected as one of 19 books that librarians say changed their lives
  • Featured in Oprah magazine as one of the books that made a difference to Rachel Griffiths

The revised edition of the ground-breaking 1998 book that introduced Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) to parents, teachers, and other non-specialists has been sold all over the world. SPD is a common and frequently misdiagnosed problem in which the central nervous system misinterprets messages from the senses. This new edition features additional information on visual and hearing deficits, motor skill difficulties, ADHD, autism, Asperger syndrome, and other related disorders.

The Out-of-Sync Child: Recognizing and Coping with Sensory Processing Disorder  by Carol Kranowitz

 

In a book review by reviewer Allison Martin we learn, “Several very useful checklists are provided to help you determine if you child has any of these sensory integration problems. The book concludes with a lengthy description of exercises and activities that a parent or therapist can do with a child to assist them in becoming less bothered by sensory issues. Parents, teachers and therapists will find the diagnostic checklists of sensory dysfunction and the sensory integration activities to be extremely beneficial.

Excerpts from The Out-of-Sync Child: Recognizing and Coping with Sensory Processing Disorder
By the age of three or four, a child should have mastered a bilateral skill called “crossing the midline.” This is the ability to move one hand, foot, or eye into the space of the other hand, foot or eye. We cross the midline when we scratch an elbow, cross our ankles, and read left to right.

For the child who avoids crossing the midline, coordinating both body sides may be difficult. When she paints at an easel she may switch the brush from one hand to the other at the midway point separating her right and left sides. She may appear not to have established a hand preference, sometimes using her left and sometimes her right to eat, draw, write, or throw. It may also be hard to survey a scene or to track a moving object visually without stopping at the midline to blink and refocus.

The child who is hypersensitive to touch has tactile defensiveness, the tendency to react negatively and emotionally to unexpected, light touch sensations. The child will react not only to actual touch but also to the anticipation of being touched. Instead of responding with an appropriate “Uh, oh” to light touch, the child responds with “Oh, no! Get away! Don’t touch me! Perceiving most touch sensations to be uncomfortable or scary, he overreacts with a fight-or-flight response.

About the Author:

CAROL STOCK KRCAROL STOCK KRANOWITZ, MA, is the author of The Out-of-Sync Child Grows Up: Coping with Sensory Processing Disorder in the Adolescent and Young Adult Years – May 24 2016ANOWITZ, MA, is the author of The Out-of-Sync Child and The Out-of-Sync Child Has Fun, and coauthor of Growing an In-Sync Child. A former preschool teacher who first noticed sensory challenges among her students, she is now world-renowned as a speaker and expert on the subject of Sensory Processing Disorder.

Her new book in the “Sync” series is “The Out-of-Sync Child Grows Up: Coping with Sensory Processing Disorder in the Adolescent and Young Adult Years” (Tarcher/Perigee 2016). This book follows “The Out-of-Sync Child: Recognizing and Coping with Sensory Processing Disorder” revised (Perigee 2005); “The Out-of-Sync Child Has Fun: Activities for Kids with SPD” revised (Perigee 2006); and “Growing an In-Sync Child” with Joye Newman (Perigee 2010). Other Sync titles are a children’s book, “The Goodenoughs Get In Sync” (Sensory World, 2010) and “The In-Sync Activity Card Book” with Joye Newman (Sensory World, 2012).

For 30 years, she has been writing and speaking about SPD, a neurological difficulty in processing sensory information coming in to one’s central nervous system and using this sensory information to function smoothly in daily life.

Carol lives in Maryland, has two sons and daughters-in-law and five grandchildren, and plays the cello.

Follow Carol Stock Kranowitz:

Website: 

Facebook

Twitter @OutOfSyncChild

Buy Books by Carol Stock Kranowitz or co-authored by her: Growing an In-Sync Child Simple, Fun Activities to Help Every Child Develop, Learn, and Grow by Carol Kranowitz and Joye Newman

  • The Out-of-Sync Child Grows Up: Coping with Sensory Processing Disorder in the Adolescent and Young Adult Years – May 24th, 2016  Amazon.com  Amazon.ca
  • In-Sync Activity Cards: 50 Simple, New Activities to Help Children Develop, Learn, and Grow! – May 16th, 2012 Amazon.com Amazon.ca 
  • Growing an In-Sync Child – Fun Activities for Kids to Develop, Learn and Grow – May 4th, 2010  Amazon.com Amazon.ca 
  • The Goodenoughs Get in Sync: 5 Family Members Overcome Their Special Sensory Issues – April 1st, 2010  Amazon.com Amazon.ca 
  • The Goodenoughs Get in Sync ~New Edition~ 5 Family Members Overcome their Special Sensory Issues by Carol Knanowitz,Out-of-Sync Child: Recognizing and Coping with Sensory Processing Disorder  – April 4th, 2006 Amazon.com  Amazon.ca 

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This post was written by Lorna
Lorna d’Entremont: Co-owner of SentioLife Solutions, Ltd. the company behind KidCompanions Chewelry (2007) and SentioCHEWS (2013), mother of three, grandma of 5 and wife. She is a retired teacher and special needs advocate. Throughout she has taught all levels from grade 2 to grade 9. Lorna loved teaching and enjoyed seeing the students progress in the school system. During her 30 year career she took a few years off to raise her three children.
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